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Nevada Gambling Recovery Providers Go Digital

Nevada Gambling Recovery

Nearly 180,000 Nevadans struggle with a gambling problem. COVID-19 has changed everyone's daily lives; especially those who struggle with this issue.

These individuals may now face the added stress of potential layoffs, decreased income and increased isolation as all nonessential businesses across the state temporarily close.

But there is hope.

These individuals and their loved ones are now in a position to evaluate their lives, and they don't have to do it alone. Despite social distancing and sheltering in place guidelines, the State of Nevada, through ProjectWorthNV.org, and problem gambling providers have removed the barrier to obtaining help. Treatment providers are evolving recovery methods and going digital with low-cost or free telehealth services.

Nevada's state-funded problem gambling recovery centers are providing telehealth services to accommodate social distancing protocols and to continue offering their confidential services during the pandemic.

  • Reno Problem Gambling Center and New Frontier Treatment Center in northern Nevada have completely shifted to digital care.
  • Las Vegas-based centers, Robert Hunter International Problem Gambling Center and Mental Health Counseling and Consulting, continue to provide in-person recovery and are adhering to social distancing guidelines. They are also providing treatment via confidential phone calls and HIPAA-compliant video conferencing.
  • Bristlecone Family Resources in Reno is offering telehealth care for its outpatient services and following social distancing guidelines with its residential program participants.

Those looking for virtual recovery resources can visit ProjectWorthNV.org to find the list of providers continuing to offer resources including digital care, as well as national call, text and chat helplines.

"Nevadans may turn to online gambling now that casino gaming and sports betting aren't options," said Alan Feldman, chair of the Advisory Committee of Problem Gambling (ACPG). "There are some Nevadans who already struggle with gambling problems and others that may begin to struggle now that they are faced with more free time and the possibility of increased loneliness or boredom. Add to this the potential economic pressures from all of the business closures, and this becomes a good time for gamblers to reevaluate their resources and seek treatment if necessary."

Project Worth connects website visitors to five state-funded treatment centers – three in northern Nevada and two in southern Nevada.

 

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